Harmony as Productivity in Distributed Teams

This is the final article in our series on AI and talent management. To read the other articles, click here.

Meditation and tranquility stones stacked on a rainy pond.

We’ve written about this topic elsewhere, but we would like to restate one of our guiding lights: that harmony is productivity.   

When we talk about harmony, we are not just talking about employees that get along and enjoy working together. That is important, and studies have shown that employees who like the people they work with will stay longer and experience less negativity at work.   

However, other studies have shown that “harmony” can create a professional culture where work doesn’t get done, people don’t actually solve problems together, and that “harmony” becomes an excuse to socialize. This is what Q4 Solutions calls “Pacify and Socialize”, where professional and personal challenges and needs are never addressed because they want to maintain a peaceful and harmonious work environment.   

Harmony is a consciously created space where colleagues in a workforce actively work together to solve problems, address challenges, and address needs.   

A friendly team does not always work well together, but a harmonious team can build a collaborative unit that can solve any problem.   

Merging Strategy, Productivity, and Harmony in the Office and at Home  

Three women and two men meditating in an office.

Having a harmonious team can make your operation flexible and productive. None of that means anything unless you have a strategy to focus that productivity on something bigger. More importantly, a melding of strategy with a harmonious team can provide your organization with something that very few have: clarity of vision with a team that can execute it.   

According to the Harvard Business Review, executives report that they lose 40% of a strategy’s potential due to breakdowns in execution. Think about that: no matter how brilliant you are and no matter how amazing or air-tight your strategy is, it could lose up to 40% of its potential impact simply through execution.   

Do not rush to blame your stakeholders either. A lack of execution often is a failure on leadership to address the obstacles and needs of that team.   

Execution is just as much a part of the strategy as the strategy itself. This means that, if you are committed to developing a strategy and its execution, you need to use data and intelligence to bring your team into harmony.   

Bringing Your Stakeholders into Harmony  

A man and woman sitting across from each other working on laptops.

You are executing a strategy, you are worried about the outcomes, but you are ready to engage your employees so that you can mitigate some of the roadblocks that stand in your way: 

  • Focus on the needs and challenges of your stakeholders. These needs and challenges are going to become the focus of your execution efforts. The more you know about them, the more you can address them.   
  • Focus on the needs and challenges of your stakeholders. These needs and challenges are going to become the focus of your execution efforts. The more you know about them, the more you can address them.  
  • Focus on the needs and challenges of your stakeholders. These needs and challenges are going to become the focus of your execution efforts. The more you know about them, the more you can address them.   

The End Goal is Collaboration with Distributed Teams  

No strategy is a one-man operation, and no leader is a one-man show. The goal of any execution should be to get stakeholders to work together to identify problems and collaborate on solutions.   

With distributed teams, this can be a bigger challenge. As mentioned above, having employees that work well together is not necessarily a recipe for success. This is even clearer in distributed teams where the specifics of strategies can get lost over remote meetings without direct management from leadership.   

Building effective execution in a remote team is about aligning strategy, execution, and standardization across the organization. That calls for a unity of action: stakeholders should be thinking strategically about their jobs and how they can collaborate to clear roadblocks to success. Likewise, you and your leadership team should be facilitating scrums or other hands-on support to ensure that these individuals are aligned with your strategy, and your strategy aligned with them.  

Most importantly, you should be setting them up for success. That means making sure that all stakeholders can find roadblocks and the best way to clear them out.   

If you are interested in learning more about strategic intelligence and collaboration for remote teams, then contact a representative from sagebeacon.ai to discuss your needs.